DIY PlayStation 5 Tablet almost makes the PlayStation Portal moot

Although the handheld gaming trend has been going strong recently, especially with the likes of the Nintendo Switch and the Steam Deck leading the market, major console makers haven’t taken the plunge completely yet. Granted, Xbox isn’t too concerned because every Windows gaming handheld PC can theoretically run some of its titles, but Sony introduced a rather odd and quite unsatisfying version of this idea. The PlayStation Portal isn’t being “portable” for a reason, since it basically just streams games from the PS5 sitting somewhere in your house. Take it to more enterprising creators to bring the PlayStation 5 Portable dream to life, like this rather impressive gigantic PlayStation 5 “Tablet Edition” that is very much worth all the hard work involved.

Designer: Matthew Perks

The PlayStation 5 diverges from generations of console design with a sleek, futuristic, yet also alien aesthetic that some have compared to a trophy. But it’s especially thanks to that new design, especially the improvement Sony quietly made after launching the console, that makes this creative endeavor even possible. In a nutshell, Sony trimmed the PS5 motherboard down to a smaller size that could be made to fit inside a thick and hefty 14-inch tablet. That, however, was the least of the project’s problems, considering the things inside that actually make the bulk of the PS5’s, well, bulk.

The PlayStation 5 generates around 200W of heat at full power, so the majority of the console’s internals are actually devoted to thermal management. These include bulky fans and a strange-looking heatsink that would never fit any portable design. That’s why the majority of the effort around this PS5 tablet was spent on figuring out an equally efficient thermal management system that didn’t take up too much vertical space. Thanks to some creative thinking and a lot of research, that problem was eventually solved to much satisfaction.

With the biggest engineering hurdle out of the way, putting the rest of the giant tablet was relatively easier. A 3D-printed shell had to be made that matched the black-and-white aesthetic of the PS5. The screen of choice for this project was a 14-inch OLED salvaged from a broken laptop, allowing game graphics to really shine. Finally, an external power source had to be designed since the original PS5 power supply was just too large and too weird to use as is.

After much work, the PS5 Tablet Edition, a.k.a. PS GO, was ready to be put to the test, and the end result is truly impressive, both from the thermal aspect and especially in performance and visual quality. It’s a truly portable system that can fit inside a backpack, though you’ll have to plug it somewhere to actually use it. Then again, the idea was to create a more social console that you can take to your friend’s or relative’s house so that you can enjoy the experience together, rather than sitting in a corner, alone in the dark, mashing the buttons on your handheld PC.

Galaxy Tab Active5 rugged tablet leaked with suitcase design and stylus

Thanks to the Apple iPad Pro, tablets have been given a bit of a lifeline. To be honest, there’s still a bit of uncertainty regarding the purpose of these large screens, especially with smartphones now having extra big displays. There are, however, industries where tablets play an essential role, whether it’s in communication, retrieving information, or organizing data. In this line of work, tablets don’t have to look stylish or have the latest specs as it is more important for them to be durable and reliable, no matter the environment. That’s the core focus of the upcoming Galaxy Tab Active5, but it seems that Samsung isn’t missing the opportunity to add a few fine touches to this rugged device.

Designer: Samsung (via MSPoweruser)

Samsung’s rugged tablets have always been built like tanks and they have the design to prove it. They’re thick and have plenty of protective layers, which definitely makes them look the part of a device that might survive even getting run over by a truck. Looking unappealing, however, isn’t really a requirement, and Samsung has been playing around with a variety of designs to give the tablet a bit more personality.

With the Galaxy Tab Active5, Samsung is adopting a design that might remind some of those super-durable suitcases, complete with linear bumps across the surface. Those humps aren’t just for show, though, as they help diffuse the force of impact away from the sensitive electronics inside the tablet. It’s definitely not stylish, but it’s not terribly unattractive either.

Samsung is also giving the tablet a stylus, similar to its predecessor. Now, you aren’t going to make art using it, though that’s certainly doable. It’s meant more to be used as a precise input tool, especially for those times when you’re wearing gloves that don’t work on touch screens. Of course, you could also use it to scribble notes and draw quick diagrams or directions, something you can’t easily do even with a naked finger.

Despite these contemporary designs and features, the Galaxy Tab Active5 is undeniably a few steps behind compared to even the cheapest tablets today. That’s true not just for the specs but also for the interface. There are even navigation buttons under the screen that haven’t been seen since the likes of the Galaxy S7 from 2016. Those buttons, however, are critical for frontline workers who might not always have the luxury of having their fingers exposed to the elements, giving users alternative methods of controlling the tablet under any situation.

Lenovo ThinkBook Plus leak shows a laptop with an Android tablet as the screen

Laptops are no longer what they used to be. Sure, the majority still come in the standard clamshell design, but even those sometimes have touchscreens or even second displays. And then there are laptops that are actually tablets in disguise, folding backward or splitting in half. These convertibles and detachables, respectively, have shifted the landscape of portable computers, opening the doors to more use cases and features. For the most part, however, they’re all still typical Windows laptops, but Lenovo might be putting an odd twist to the design with a 2-in-1 laptop whose screen transforms into an Android tablet when detached from its main body.

Designer Name: Lenovo (via “Apocalypse“)

The idea behind a 2-in-1 laptop, popularized by the likes of the Microsoft Surface Pro, is actually the reverse of a laptop. Technically, it’s more of a tablet that you can attach to a keyboard, whether that keyboard simply serves as a cover or a weighted base like a regular laptop. All the electronics are actually behind the screen, from the processors to the storage to even the battery, making the screen completely standalone.

What Lenovo might have in mind, however, is to have two different operating systems installed on the device, working independently depending on the situation. When the screen is docked on the keyboard, it will display Windows that’s running in the base. Once pulled out, however, that screen becomes a standalone tablet running Android and not Windows.

ASUS Transformer Book Duet

As odd as that might sound, it’s not exactly completely new. Back in 2014, ASUS announced what would have been the crowning glory of its Transformer Book line of 2-in-1 detachable laptops. The Transformer Book Duet could run both Android and Windows, though you have to boot into each one separately. Here, all the computing hardware is still on the display, and the keyboard is just an accessory to keep the screen anchored down. ASUS’s ambitions, however, were allegedly crushed by both Microsoft and Google who didn’t want their operating systems to be living under the same roof. That was nearly a decade ago, however, and Lenovo might be thinking it’s time to stir things up again.

What isn’t clear is whether it will be a case of a dual-boot tablet again or if Lenovo will be doing things a little differently. It’s possible to have a complete set of hardware inside the keyboard, running Windows, while the tablet has its own hardware dedicated to running Android. That makes the division of labor a little simpler and you don’t have to reboot over and over again to switch between operating systems. Unfortunately, that would also mean you can’t use Windows in tablet mode and take advantage of the stylus for creating digital art. Then again, Windows hasn’t really been great on tablets, which is why there would be interest in putting Android there in the first place.

Lenovo ThinkBook Plus leak shows a laptop with an Android tablet as the screen

Laptops are no longer what they used to be. Sure, the majority still come in the standard clamshell design, but even those sometimes have touchscreens or even second displays. And then there are laptops that are actually tablets in disguise, folding backward or splitting in half. These convertibles and detachables, respectively, have shifted the landscape of portable computers, opening the doors to more use cases and features. For the most part, however, they’re all still typical Windows laptops, but Lenovo might be putting an odd twist to the design with a 2-in-1 laptop whose screen transforms into an Android tablet when detached from its main body.

Designer Name: Lenovo (via “Apocalypse“)

The idea behind a 2-in-1 laptop, popularized by the likes of the Microsoft Surface Pro, is actually the reverse of a laptop. Technically, it’s more of a tablet that you can attach to a keyboard, whether that keyboard simply serves as a cover or a weighted base like a regular laptop. All the electronics are actually behind the screen, from the processors to the storage to even the battery, making the screen completely standalone.

What Lenovo might have in mind, however, is to have two different operating systems installed on the device, working independently depending on the situation. When the screen is docked on the keyboard, it will display Windows that’s running in the base. Once pulled out, however, that screen becomes a standalone tablet running Android and not Windows.

ASUS Transformer Book Duet

As odd as that might sound, it’s not exactly completely new. Back in 2014, ASUS announced what would have been the crowning glory of its Transformer Book line of 2-in-1 detachable laptops. The Transformer Book Duet could run both Android and Windows, though you have to boot into each one separately. Here, all the computing hardware is still on the display, and the keyboard is just an accessory to keep the screen anchored down. ASUS’s ambitions, however, were allegedly crushed by both Microsoft and Google who didn’t want their operating systems to be living under the same roof. That was nearly a decade ago, however, and Lenovo might be thinking it’s time to stir things up again.

What isn’t clear is whether it will be a case of a dual-boot tablet again or if Lenovo will be doing things a little differently. It’s possible to have a complete set of hardware inside the keyboard, running Windows, while the tablet has its own hardware dedicated to running Android. That makes the division of labor a little simpler and you don’t have to reboot over and over again to switch between operating systems. Unfortunately, that would also mean you can’t use Windows in tablet mode and take advantage of the stylus for creating digital art. Then again, Windows hasn’t really been great on tablets, which is why there would be interest in putting Android there in the first place.

This multipurpose tablet orients in any direction for work and play on the go

Having a single gadget that takes care of your professional work, entertainment and gaming needs is in trend. More so when you can’t carry around multiple gadgets all the time. A tablet solves most of the purposes but then you must buy additional accessories too, thereby adding to the overall cost.

iScream Homelearn Book gets over this catch-22 situation with a mindfully designed gadget that’s well-tailored for any member of your family. Whether you love to binge-watch, do long gaming sessions, or get down to prepping your next big presentation; this versatile next-gen tablet is for you.

Designer: Found Founded

The mobile device is a combination of a large screen, tablet stand and a keyboard for setting up in any orientation. With the pedestals, detachable magnets and the robust build this gadget can be maneuvered in any direction without the fear of toppling over. In that sense, it’s your mini PC on the go.

The makers have kept the design and the color schema to be ultra-simple to avoid any visual distractions while working. It comes with a stylus pen to scribe down text, make digital art, or jot down any other details, much like the Galaxy S23 Ultra smartphone. Of course, other options on the market from players like Apple, Samsung, Amazon and Microsoft are there, but having the ecosystem of all accessories finely tuned with the main gadget is an advantage.

There is no word if the iScream is going to get past the concept and prototype stage or is it going to be released someday as a buyable option. If it does, the software-hardware integration has to be spot-on if the makers want to enter the closely contested market space!